Monthly Archives: April 2015

Brookgreen Aviary

This morning I went to Brookgreen Gardens and took a quick walkabout through the avairy. Below are a few images from this little trip.

Black-Browned-Night-Heron-in-Tree-web

Above is a Black Browned Night Heron roosting in a tree.

Black-Browned-Night-Heron-Preening-web

Above is another Black Crowned Night Heron preening himself.

Black-Browned-Night-Heron-web

This one looks a little ticked-off!

Cattle-Egret-Breeding-Plumage-web

Above is a Cattle Egret in breeding plumage! Looking for a date?

Ibis-in-woods-webFound an Ibis in the woods!

Posted in art and entertainment, bird, brookgreen, murrells inlet, photography

Brookgreen Butterfly House

Today I was able to visit the butterfly house at Brookgreen Gardens.

Imagine yourself in a place where the brilliance and delicate fragrance of tropical flowers blend with the sound of water as it gently tumbles over rocks in a stream. Hundreds of butterflies flutter back and forth as if trying to decide which they like best – the flowers’ sweet nectar or a refreshing dip in the pool. Then, one of these beautiful creatures lightly lands on your finger. You want to focus your camera and capture the image but know at the first sign of movement the butterfly will fly away. So you sit quietly, captivated by the beauty of your visit to Brookgreen’s Butterfly House.

Colorful, dainty creatures, butterflies belong to the Lepidoptera order of insects. They are cold-blooded and depend on the sun to regulate their temperature. They are essential pollinators in the garden and need nectar plants for the adults, plants that provide food and camouflage for caterpillars, and plants to provide shelter from wind and rain. All over the world, butterflies are valued for their beauty and currently inhabit every continent except Antarctica.

The butterfly house contains a pupae emergence room where you can observe the transformation from chrysalis to adult butterflies. Interpretive signs throughout the exhibit describe the life cycle of butterflies and the important role they play in our environment. The exhibit is open daily April – October, and tickets are $3 for adults and $2 for children in addition to garden admission.

The most recent addition to the Lowcountry Zoo, the butterfly house accommodates dozens of species of butterflies that are native to the Southeast. They support Brookgreen’s mission to exhibit and educate visitors about the animals, ecology, and plants in our area. Come and see its beauty for yourself but don’t forget to bring your camera.

Here are a few shots I was able to get today!

Black-Butterfly-web Buckeyes-web Eastern-Tiger-Swallowtail-web Malachi-Butterfly-web Monarch-web Orange-Sulpher-Butterfly-web zebra-heliconian-web

Posted in brookgreen, garden, outdoor

Kaleidoscope Images

Do you remember playing with a kaleidoscope as a kid? You know, that cylinder with mirrors and loose colored objects like beads or pebbles or bits of glass. You would turn the cylinder and watch with amazement as wonderous shapes took form and then changed before your eyes.

Most kaleidoscopes are mass-produced from inexpensive materials, and intended as children’s toys. At the other extreme are handmade pieces that display fine craftsmanship. Craft galleries often carry a few kaleidoscopes, while other enterprises specialize in them, carrying dozens of different types from different artists and craftspeople. Most handmade kaleidoscopes are now made in Russia and Italy, following a long tradition of glass craftsmanship in those countries.

I like to create my own kaleidoscope images – images that look like what you might see when looking into a kaleidoscope. Below are some I created today. Let me know if you enjoy them!

Click each image for larger view.

BOP-Kaleidoscope-webTulipField-Kaleidoscope-web  English-Daisy-Kaleidoscope-webBOP-Orb-Kaleidoscope-web Azalea-Kaleidoscope-web

Posted in abstract, art and entertainment, Digital Art, Fun Stuff, kaleidoscope

Visit to Brookgreen Gardens

This afternoon I made a quick trip to visit Brookgreen Gardens and photograph some of the flowers that spring has brought out. What is Brookgreen Gardens, you might be asking. Well here is a brief description and following that you can see some of the images I made while there today.

As a haven for indigenous plant life and a natural refuge for animals, Brookgreen Gardens is a sanctuary. Since 1931, its environmental-friendly preservation has been a policy handed down by founders Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington.

In the Gardens Brookgreen protects over 2,000 species of plants in its nature preserve, and has nine ecosystems that exemplify coastal South Carolina unlike anywhere else. These range from salt marshes to longleaf pine, mixed hardwood, and river bluff forests.
Irrigation is performed only when necessary and only on land areas, not on hard surfaces, to prevent run-off. Brookgreen uses only organic or slow release fertilizers. The latter releases chemicals slowly so they go directly to the plant’s root system rather than to the ground water, which feeds springs and wells. Another way in which Brookgreen also accents its eco-friendly policy is by its composting of materials to use in the planting beds of the gardens.

Click on any image for larger view:

TulipField-webUnknown-web YellowWhite-web Daffodill-with-Bug-web Daffodills-web Bells-web Azaleas-everywhere-web Snow-Bells-web PurpleWhite-web Dont-Know-web

Posted in art and entertainment, brookgreen, flowers, outdoor, photography