Monthly Archives: July 2015

Sabattier Effect Revisited

I got an email from someone asking about the Sabattier Effect. After answering his questions, I realized I had not done anything using this effect for quite some time. So I dug up an image I thought would work well and applied the effect. This image is of some small boats tied up in the harbor of Sorrento, Maine.
Should you be interested in trying this effect on your own images, there is a written and video tutorial here: Sabattier Effect

 

Sabattier Effect on Sorrento Harbor boats.

Sabattier Effect on Sorrento Harbor boats.

Posted in abstract, art and entertainment, Digital Art, Maine, photography

Tips for Beach Photos

The following is a repeat of a an article I posted almost four years ago. With beach season now upon us , I thought it might be a good time to kick it back to the forefront.

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Are your holiday snaps by-the-sea often disappointing? Beach images can seem repetitive, with little more than the water’s edge and shore, or people on the beach. With a change of focus, your beach photos can be turned into unique and original images. This article highlights the most important steps to follow when taking seaside photographs.

1. Take a look at your surroundings and look for a focal point. While the seaside as a whole is beautiful to the naked eye when you’re actually on the beach, it is less interesting as a photograph because the viewer sees only a wide, open space featuring blue sky, blue sea, and yellow sand – a fairly predictable scene. To provide something on which the eye immediately comes to rest within a photograph, find a “focal point” – this is the art of focusing on something out of the ordinary to bring the beach shot to life:

  • Find the focal point of interest – a shoe, a beach umbrella, a fish and chip wrapper, your child’s toes, prints across the sand, a sandcastle, etc. Good focal points are often brightly coloured, or vary in hue from the other colours in the picture.
  • Find natural features of interest – some pebbles, rippling sand, the wave breaking at the water’s edge, palm trees, shells, seaweed, etc.
  • Find something out at sea of interest – perhaps a boat with bright sails, seals playing, or a jumping dolphin.
  • Note that anything moving across water can create interesting ripples (a bird, sea creature, boat, or wind, can all create this effect), and movement in the water will distort anything reflecting in the sea water, which can heighten interest of the photograph in good light.
2. Avoid putting the horizon in the center. Centering the horizon can give the viewer a sensation that the photo has been sliced in half, which can be disorienting, as long, unbroken horizons contain little of interest in a photo. Instead, break down the image into thirds (the “rule of thirds”), both horizontally and vertically, to create nine equal parts to your image. Keep the horizon square to the framing of your shot, in order to avoid a sloping effect.
When imagining the division of the image, focus on where the lines intersect – according to this classical rule of composition, these intersections create the optimum positions for the main subjects of your image.
3. Frame your picture. Look around you. Ask yourself what points of interest you can include in the photo. For example, are there any rocks, trees, beach houses, piers, etc., that you can use to add a natural frame to the picture? If so, use them. For example, framing a sea shot through trees can be particularly effective if you have a focal point out at sea, such as a boat.
4. Use differing levels and angles. Don’t just shoot straight on, mix the angles up a bit. Aim for something kooky, funky and interesting. Get down low to photograph children and their beach activities, stand up high to take a tree, or lie down under a pier.
5. Use colour to break up the blues and yellows of a beach scene. Blue, more blue, perhaps some yellow: beaches aren’t the most imaginative places colour-wise. This makes it important to capitalise on any splashes of colour. Vibrant colours will really stand out, and make your photo look doubly attractive.
  • For a DSLR, consider using a UV filter. This will reduce the atmospheric haze that is increased by the blueness of the sea.
  • Again for a DSLR lens, use a polarizing filter to reduce reflections and boost the contrasting shades. This can help to improve skies and ocean water by making them a darker blue.
6. Choose the best times of day to take beach photos. When the sun’s riding high it might be a nice time for sunbathing, but it’s the worst time of day for decent photos as the light is too strong and bright. The best times of day for beach photos are at the beginning and end of the day, especially around sunrise and sunset. The sun resting on the horizon looks brilliant, and it’s hard not to take a decent snap at these times. As an added bonus, you will have less people on the beach at these times of day.

 

  • Morning air is usually still and the light is quiet, delicate and diffuse until the sun rises. Early morning light changes rapidly with the sun rising, so expect your exposure times to change rapidly and to move quickly to capture the special moments.
  • Evening light often has a warm glow that provides intense gold and rose colours. Haze and shadows are common features that you can draw on as the day draws to an end.
  • Take care not to include your own shadow when taking photographs early and late in the day when the sun’s shadows are at their longest; check around the whole frame to make sure you’re not forming a part of the picture! You can easily rectify this by moving to a different position.
7. Make the most of non-sunny days. Windswept, threatening weather can create incredible, mood-infused photos at the beach. With nobody about, you can take uninterrupted views and dramatic views of dark clouds and stormy seas.
  • Mist, fogs, and haze can all work to your advantage in creating interesting features.

  • Try shooting in black and white, or flip it to black and white using a photo program such as Photoshop when you get home to cover the overcast, cloudy, sky and make things look a whole lot more atmospheric.
  • Just after a storm moves through can produce dramatic light contrasts.
8. HAVE FUN!
HBSP-Beach-web Barbados-Beach-Near-Bathsheba-web Barbados-near-Bathsheba-web
Posted in huntington beach, outdoor, photography, South Carolina

Footsteps of Paul Part Ten

Today is the last day of our trip. Tomorrow we endure a long flight home but today we will enjoy sightseeing with a Local Guide in Athens, the most important city in ancient Greece and famed for its culture, learning, and great philosophers.

Our tour today includes a visit to Mars Hill, the Acropolis and the Ancient Agora.
Mars Hill, or as it is also known, Areopagus, is a bare marble hill next to the Acropolis and is where the historic sermon about the “unknown god” was delivered. (Acts 17:15-34). The Ancient Agora is where Apostle Paul met and spoke to the Epicureans and Stoic Philosophers (Acts17:17-18),

We will then cruise through some of the City Highlights of Athens seeing: the Temple of Olympian Zeus, Hadrian’s Arch, the Parliament Bldg. and the Panathenaikon Olympic Stadium.
The Panathenaikon Stadium, also called Kallimarmaron, is near the heart of the city of Athens. It dates back to ancient times, when it was a venue hosting athletic events for the Panathenaic Games.

I hope you enjoyed living our tour through these blog posts. This will be the last of this series. Thank you!

Click on any image for larger view:

 

Parthenon

Parthenon

Mars Hill

Mars Hill

Odeum of Herodes Atticus

Odeum of Herodes Atticus

Porch of the Caryatids

Porch of the Caryatids

The Erechtheion (and Empie)

The Erechtheion (and Empie)

Temple of Athena Nike

Temple of Athena Nike

Column Detail

Column Detail

Overhead Detail

Overhead Detail

Panathenaikon Stadium

Panathenaikon Stadium

Posted in Greece, methodist, Paul, photography, travel, UMC

Footsteps of Paul Part Nine

After docking back at Pireaus, we continued to the ancient site of Corinth for a guided visit of the excavations where Apostle Paul worked for 18 months with tent makers Aquila and Priscilla.

Here the remaining columns of the Temple of Apollo are the primary structures left standing.  However, we also saw the Bema where the Roman proconsul Gallio would likely have sat when he showed complete indifference to the accusations brought against Paul (Acts 18:12-16).

In Paul’s time, Corinth had developed into a major government and commerce center of that region. It was a large cosmopolitan city, with a estimated mixed population of 400,000 people – Romans, Greeks, and Jews. Athens always led as the classic Greek city of intellectual and architectural wonders, but Corinth was where “real life” of the time happened. Gallio, the brother of Seneca, was proconsul around the time when Paul became very active in the region.

 

Site Sign

Site Sign

Acropolis of Corinth

Acropolis of Corinth

Temple of Apollo

Temple of Apollo

Museum Courtyard

Museum Courtyard

Horse Head

Horse Head

Mosaic

Mosaic

Part of Market Area

Part of Market Area

Roman Era Statue

Roman Era Statue

Roman Battle Scene

Roman Battle Scene

Don't remember who this is.

Don’t remember who this is.

Roman Art

Roman Art

Roman-Art-at-Corinth-web

Corinth Theater

Corinth Theater

Posted in Greece, Paul, photography, travel, UMC