Author Archives: Bill Barber

Sabattier Effect Revisited

I got an email from someone asking about the Sabattier Effect. After answering his questions, I realized I had not done anything using this effect for quite some time. So I dug up an image I thought would work well and applied the effect. This image is of some small boats tied up in the harbor of Sorrento, Maine.
Should you be interested in trying this effect on your own images, there is a written and video tutorial here: Sabattier Effect

 

Sabattier Effect on Sorrento Harbor boats.

Sabattier Effect on Sorrento Harbor boats.

Posted in abstract, art and entertainment, Digital Art, Maine, photography

Tips for Beach Photos

The following is a repeat of a an article I posted almost four years ago. With beach season now upon us , I thought it might be a good time to kick it back to the forefront.

—————————————————————————————————–

Are your holiday snaps by-the-sea often disappointing? Beach images can seem repetitive, with little more than the water’s edge and shore, or people on the beach. With a change of focus, your beach photos can be turned into unique and original images. This article highlights the most important steps to follow when taking seaside photographs.

1. Take a look at your surroundings and look for a focal point. While the seaside as a whole is beautiful to the naked eye when you’re actually on the beach, it is less interesting as a photograph because the viewer sees only a wide, open space featuring blue sky, blue sea, and yellow sand – a fairly predictable scene. To provide something on which the eye immediately comes to rest within a photograph, find a “focal point” – this is the art of focusing on something out of the ordinary to bring the beach shot to life:

  • Find the focal point of interest – a shoe, a beach umbrella, a fish and chip wrapper, your child’s toes, prints across the sand, a sandcastle, etc. Good focal points are often brightly coloured, or vary in hue from the other colours in the picture.
  • Find natural features of interest – some pebbles, rippling sand, the wave breaking at the water’s edge, palm trees, shells, seaweed, etc.
  • Find something out at sea of interest – perhaps a boat with bright sails, seals playing, or a jumping dolphin.
  • Note that anything moving across water can create interesting ripples (a bird, sea creature, boat, or wind, can all create this effect), and movement in the water will distort anything reflecting in the sea water, which can heighten interest of the photograph in good light.
2. Avoid putting the horizon in the center. Centering the horizon can give the viewer a sensation that the photo has been sliced in half, which can be disorienting, as long, unbroken horizons contain little of interest in a photo. Instead, break down the image into thirds (the “rule of thirds”), both horizontally and vertically, to create nine equal parts to your image. Keep the horizon square to the framing of your shot, in order to avoid a sloping effect.
When imagining the division of the image, focus on where the lines intersect – according to this classical rule of composition, these intersections create the optimum positions for the main subjects of your image.
3. Frame your picture. Look around you. Ask yourself what points of interest you can include in the photo. For example, are there any rocks, trees, beach houses, piers, etc., that you can use to add a natural frame to the picture? If so, use them. For example, framing a sea shot through trees can be particularly effective if you have a focal point out at sea, such as a boat.
4. Use differing levels and angles. Don’t just shoot straight on, mix the angles up a bit. Aim for something kooky, funky and interesting. Get down low to photograph children and their beach activities, stand up high to take a tree, or lie down under a pier.
5. Use colour to break up the blues and yellows of a beach scene. Blue, more blue, perhaps some yellow: beaches aren’t the most imaginative places colour-wise. This makes it important to capitalise on any splashes of colour. Vibrant colours will really stand out, and make your photo look doubly attractive.
  • For a DSLR, consider using a UV filter. This will reduce the atmospheric haze that is increased by the blueness of the sea.
  • Again for a DSLR lens, use a polarizing filter to reduce reflections and boost the contrasting shades. This can help to improve skies and ocean water by making them a darker blue.
6. Choose the best times of day to take beach photos. When the sun’s riding high it might be a nice time for sunbathing, but it’s the worst time of day for decent photos as the light is too strong and bright. The best times of day for beach photos are at the beginning and end of the day, especially around sunrise and sunset. The sun resting on the horizon looks brilliant, and it’s hard not to take a decent snap at these times. As an added bonus, you will have less people on the beach at these times of day.

 

  • Morning air is usually still and the light is quiet, delicate and diffuse until the sun rises. Early morning light changes rapidly with the sun rising, so expect your exposure times to change rapidly and to move quickly to capture the special moments.
  • Evening light often has a warm glow that provides intense gold and rose colours. Haze and shadows are common features that you can draw on as the day draws to an end.
  • Take care not to include your own shadow when taking photographs early and late in the day when the sun’s shadows are at their longest; check around the whole frame to make sure you’re not forming a part of the picture! You can easily rectify this by moving to a different position.
7. Make the most of non-sunny days. Windswept, threatening weather can create incredible, mood-infused photos at the beach. With nobody about, you can take uninterrupted views and dramatic views of dark clouds and stormy seas.
  • Mist, fogs, and haze can all work to your advantage in creating interesting features.

  • Try shooting in black and white, or flip it to black and white using a photo program such as Photoshop when you get home to cover the overcast, cloudy, sky and make things look a whole lot more atmospheric.
  • Just after a storm moves through can produce dramatic light contrasts.
8. HAVE FUN!
HBSP-Beach-web Barbados-Beach-Near-Bathsheba-web Barbados-near-Bathsheba-web
Posted in huntington beach, outdoor, photography, South Carolina

Footsteps of Paul Part Ten

Today is the last day of our trip. Tomorrow we endure a long flight home but today we will enjoy sightseeing with a Local Guide in Athens, the most important city in ancient Greece and famed for its culture, learning, and great philosophers.

Our tour today includes a visit to Mars Hill, the Acropolis and the Ancient Agora.
Mars Hill, or as it is also known, Areopagus, is a bare marble hill next to the Acropolis and is where the historic sermon about the “unknown god” was delivered. (Acts 17:15-34). The Ancient Agora is where Apostle Paul met and spoke to the Epicureans and Stoic Philosophers (Acts17:17-18),

We will then cruise through some of the City Highlights of Athens seeing: the Temple of Olympian Zeus, Hadrian’s Arch, the Parliament Bldg. and the Panathenaikon Olympic Stadium.
The Panathenaikon Stadium, also called Kallimarmaron, is near the heart of the city of Athens. It dates back to ancient times, when it was a venue hosting athletic events for the Panathenaic Games.

I hope you enjoyed living our tour through these blog posts. This will be the last of this series. Thank you!

Click on any image for larger view:

 

Parthenon

Parthenon

Mars Hill

Mars Hill

Odeum of Herodes Atticus

Odeum of Herodes Atticus

Porch of the Caryatids

Porch of the Caryatids

The Erechtheion (and Empie)

The Erechtheion (and Empie)

Temple of Athena Nike

Temple of Athena Nike

Column Detail

Column Detail

Overhead Detail

Overhead Detail

Panathenaikon Stadium

Panathenaikon Stadium

Posted in Greece, methodist, Paul, photography, travel, UMC

Footsteps of Paul Part Nine

After docking back at Pireaus, we continued to the ancient site of Corinth for a guided visit of the excavations where Apostle Paul worked for 18 months with tent makers Aquila and Priscilla.

Here the remaining columns of the Temple of Apollo are the primary structures left standing.  However, we also saw the Bema where the Roman proconsul Gallio would likely have sat when he showed complete indifference to the accusations brought against Paul (Acts 18:12-16).

In Paul’s time, Corinth had developed into a major government and commerce center of that region. It was a large cosmopolitan city, with a estimated mixed population of 400,000 people – Romans, Greeks, and Jews. Athens always led as the classic Greek city of intellectual and architectural wonders, but Corinth was where “real life” of the time happened. Gallio, the brother of Seneca, was proconsul around the time when Paul became very active in the region.

 

Site Sign

Site Sign

Acropolis of Corinth

Acropolis of Corinth

Temple of Apollo

Temple of Apollo

Museum Courtyard

Museum Courtyard

Horse Head

Horse Head

Mosaic

Mosaic

Part of Market Area

Part of Market Area

Roman Era Statue

Roman Era Statue

Roman Battle Scene

Roman Battle Scene

Don't remember who this is.

Don’t remember who this is.

Roman Art

Roman Art

Roman-Art-at-Corinth-web

Corinth Theater

Corinth Theater

Posted in Greece, Paul, photography, travel, UMC

Footsteps of Paul Part Eight

Our next stop on the Footsteps of Paul Tour was a place Paul probably did not visit. We enjoyed it anyway!

Santorini, one of the Cyclades islands in the Aegean Sea, was devastated by a volcanic eruption in the 16th century B.C.E., forever shaping its rugged landscape and villages. The whitewashed, cubist houses of its 2 principal towns, Fira and Oia, cling to cliffs above an underwater caldera (crater). They overlook the clear Aegean and beaches made up of black, red and white lava pebbles.

Santorini is the most popular island in Greece. It may be the most popular island in the world. There are few travel destinations that combine beautiful beaches, spectacular scenery, ancient cities, amazing restaurants, some of the world’s best wine, and an active volcano. But Santorini has all this and more.

Click on any image for larger view:

We took cable car to top, others hiked up!

We took cable car to top, others hiked up!

Everything is perched on the hillside.

Everything is perched on the hillside.

Cable Cars

Cable Cars

Some homes are built into the hillside. Prime real estate.

Some homes are built into the hillside. Prime real estate.

Can you imagine  having this view everyday?

Can you imagine having this view everyday?

We made it to the top!

We made it to the top!

One of many towers.

One of many towers.

Clock tower

Clock tower

Local shop

Local shop

So pretty!

So pretty!

Sounds like a plan!

Sounds like a plan!

Posted in Greece, methodist, Paul, photography, travel, UMC

Footsteps of Paul Part Seven

This afternoon, on our Footsteps of Paul tour, we continued your cruise to Patmos, one of the Sporades. A small rugged island of the Icarian Sea, part of the Aegean. The scene of John’s banishment (by Domitian), where he “was in the Spirit on the Lord’s day.” The rocky solitude suited the sublime nature of the Revelation. On a hill in the southern half of the island is the monastery of John the divine, and the traditional grotto of his receiving the Apocalypse. We got to enter into the monastery and see some of the oldest Biblical manuscripts, including the Purple Codex.

In the middle ages called Palmosa from its palms; now there is but one, and the island has resumed its old name Patmo or Patino. It is unvisited by Turks, without any mosque, and saddled with moderate tribute, free from piracy, slavery, and any police but their own.

We were also able to see the famed Windmills of Patmos. Two of these windmills on a hill just below Hora village were built in 1588 (the third in 1863), when the relatively new technology spread throughout Europe. In the 1950s the windmills were abandoned and became derelict. Since 2009 the windmills have been restored for use as an example of conservation, alternative technology, as a cultural and educational resource and tourist attraction.

Click on any image for larger view:

Patmos Panorama

Patmos Panorama

Looking back on our cruise ship

Looking back on our cruise ship

Mosaic of John dictating his revelation to his scribe.

Mosaic of John dictating his revelation to his scribe.

Windmills of Patmos

Windmills of Patmos

Posted in Greece, Paul, photography, travel, Turkey, UMC

Footsteps of Paul Part Six

Today we docked in the Turkish port of Kusadasi. Once the ship was cleared by customs, we boarded a tour bus with a wonderful tour guide who called himself “Oz”. He had been born and raised in Kusadasi and was knowledgable and proud of his heritage.

This western quarter of Turkey was called Asia Minor during the Roman period, and Ephesus was its largest city. When Paul arrived in Ephesus, Priscilla and Aquila greeted him, introduced him to the congregation that met at their house and briefed him on the status of the local movement. According to Acts, Ephesus had believers who had been baptized by disciples of John the Baptist and followed a teacher named Apollos. He had since left Ephesus for Corinth, with a letter of introduction from Aquila and Priscilla. The Ephesus community knew the teachings of Jesus, but had not heard Paul’s message of the holy spirit. Similar variations, and sometimes rivalry, must have marked many early congregations, varying by teacher, local tradition, and communications with other cities. In his circuit of travels, Paul tried to establish some continuity. Paul would spend three years in Ephesus, and may have been imprisoned for some of that time. His letters indicate that he made visits to Corinth during his stay. And, as in Corinth, Paul earned his keep working as a tentmaker when he could, and depended on the support of his congregations when he could not. With this support he was able to spread his message even while under arrest.

This afternoon we continued our cruise to Patmos, the “Jerusalem of the Aegean,” where we enjoyed an excursion to the MONASTERY OF ST. JOHN and to the CAVE OF THE APOCALYPSE, where John the Evangelist dictated the Book of the Revelation during his exile. This will be the subject of Part Seven!

Our ship in Kusadasi

Our ship in Kusadasi

Looking out at the commercial Agora

Looking out at the commercial Agora

Water Distribution Pipes

Water Distribution Pipes

Bath of Varius

Bath of Varius

Entrance to the Odeum

Entrance to the Odeum

Fountain of Pollio

Fountain of Pollio

Odeon

Odeon

Prytaneion

Prytaneion

Domitian Temple

Domitian Temple

The Domitian Temple

The Domitian Temple

Near Hercules gate

Near Hercules gate

Ceretes Street

Ceretes Street

Curetes Street leading to library

Curetes Street leading to library

Mosaic floor along Curetes Street

Mosaic floor along Curetes Street

Mosaic floor along Curetes Street

Mosaic floor along Curetes Street

Celsus Library

Celsus Library

Detail work at Celsus Library

Detail work at Celsus Library

Detail in excavated column

Detail in excavated column

Statue at Celsus Library

Statue at Celsus Library

Posted in Greece, photography, travel, Turkey, UMC

Footsteps of Paul Part Five

I hope you have enjoyed following the adventures of our intrepid band of 23 on our Footsteps of Paul trip. We certainly had a wonderful time.

Today we left Athens early in the morning for Piraeus and set sail into the Aegean Sea. In the afternoon we arrived at our first island: Mykonos (also spelled Myconos), which belongs to the group of the Cyclades. The mountainous island of Mykonos has about 400 churches. The main city consists of pisturesque white houses and the island’s trademakrs: the charming windmills. The place has a unique architecture of Byzantine and Western characteristics and will simply enchant you. Must “sees” include the Cathedral on the main square as well as the many boutiques and taverns along tiny paved streets. Mykonos combines in a unique way the luxuriant and sophisticated lifestyle with the
simple and yet charming life of a Cycladic Island.

We returned to the ship for a late evening meal and got underway for Kusadasi, Turkey, from where we would tour Ephessos in the morning.

Click on any image below for larger view:

 

Celestial Olympia

Celestial Olympia

 

View from ship

View from ship

Harbor view

Harbor view

Agios Nikolakis

Agios Nikolakis

Panagia Paraportiani

Panagia Paraportiani

Harbor Scene

Harbor Scene

Famous Mykonos windmills

Famous Mykonos windmills

Scenic alleyway

Scenic alleyway

Catholic Church in Mykonos

Catholic Church in Mykonos

Bistro Seating

Bistro Seating

Liz's favorite stop!

Liz’s favorite stop!

Apartment staircase

Apartment staircase

Red dome church

Red dome church

Red boat

Red boat

Sunset in Mykonos

Sunset in Mykonos

Posted in Greece, Paul, photography, travel

Footsteps of Paul Part Four

We stayed overnight at the Hotel Meteoritis which is within view of the Meteora Monasteries. Serene, spiritual, magical, mystical, extraordinary, breathtaking, immense, inspiring, impressive. These are only some of the words people very often use in an effort to describe the Meteora phenomenon.

A trip to Meteora offers the unique experience of nature’s grandeur in conjunction with history, architecture and man’s everlasting desire to connect with the Divine. From the early Christian times, the Meteora vertical cliffs were regarded as the perfect place to achieve absolute isolation, to discover peace and harmony and, thus, to support man’s eternal struggle for spiritual elevation.

Meteora is a truly inspiring and sensational setting of overwhelming rock formations, but one must also be prepared to expect that this trip is much more than merely visiting an exquisite landscape. It is a pilgrimage to a holy place for all Christians around the world. Meteora has become a preservation ark for the 2000-year-old Christian Orthodox creed.

The gigantic rocks of Meteora are perched above the town of Kalambaka, at a maximum height of 400 m (1200 ft). The most interesting summits are decorated with historical monasteries, included in the World Heritage List of Unesco. Only 6 of them have made it through the centuries, from an initial estimated number of 24. Mostly dating to the 14th and until the 16th century, these monasteries were built by monks who were previously hermits in the area, living in individual caves. Once united, these monks took months and years to carry the construction material to the top of rocks, using ropes, folding ladders, nets and baskets, and with much determination. They then proceeded to build monasteries that deserve everybody’s awe. The monasteries had no access to electricity and water until recently.

From here we traveled back to Athens where we spent the night at the Hotel Metropolitan and prepared to board the cruise ship Celestyal Olympia.

Hotel Meteoritis

Hotel Meteoritis

Hotel Meteoritis garden area.

Hotel Meteoritis garden area.

View from Hotel gardens

View from Hotel gardens

Look at all the tour buses lined up!

Look at all the tour buses lined up!

Monastery of Great Meteoro

Monastery of Great Meteoro

Monastery of Holy Trinity

Monastery of Holy Trinity

Monastery of Roussanou

Monastery of Roussanou

Monastery of Saint Nicholas of Anapafsas

Monastery of Saint Nicholas of Anapafsas

Pots in a wall at a gift shop

Pots in a wall at a gift shop

Posted in Greece, Paul, photography, travel

Footsteps of Paul Part Three

Our next stop was the site of the ancient city of Philippi, which caught me by surprise.  The site is not nearly as developed as some of the other sites we visited.  With the exception of a few places cordoned off for active excavation, we were allowed to roam freely across the site.  What is remarkable about ancient Philippi is the number of very large Christian churches built around the fifth century.

Philippi has had its share of fame. It was built along the ancient Roman trade route called the Via Egnatia, which stretched from Rome to Constantinople (Istanbul).  Remains of this route can still be found in the northern Greek region of Macedonia.  About the year 50 AD, a new era was about to dawn on this city. Christianity had been spreading rapidly across the Middle East, down to Africa, and up through Asia Minor. One of Christianity’s foremost missionaries, the Apostle Paul, was in Troas (formerly Troy)– just across the water from Neapolis (present day Kavala). At night, Paul received a vision telling him to “step over into Macedonia and help us”.

Paul along with Luke and Silas got on a boat and made the trip, passing the island of Samothrace and then on to Neapolis.  Taking the Via Egnatia, Paul and his companions travelled the 15 kilometers further to Philippi. It was Philippi that had the claim of being the first European city to hear the message of Christianity.

Philippi also entertained great names of history like Mark Antony, Octavian, Brutus and Cassius as they faced off in the marshlands west of Ancient Philippi in the “Battle of Philippi”. This city was known as being the gateway to Europe and it is not surprising that Philippi played a large role in changing the direction of the Roman Republic.

Philippi is also interesting from a Christian perspective. Here you can follow in the footsteps of the Apostle Paul as Christianity was first spread to Europe through Philippi.

Our guide introduced us specifically to the octagonal church of St. Paul with its magnificent mosaic floor, complete with the signature of the artist! We were also able to see where Paul had been imprisoned.

The difference between Thessaloniki and Philippi could hardly be more stark.  One has grown into a massive living city; the other is an abandoned ruin.

We continued on to Kalambaka (Meteora) where we had dinner and stayed the night at Hotel Meteoritis . Along the way we caught glimpses of the Meteora Monasteries that we would visit the next day!  That’s next in Part 4!

Overview of Philippi

Overview of Philippi

Ancient Theater

Ancient Theater

The Agora (market place)

The Agora (market place)

Looking across the Agora

Looking across the Agora

Almost 2,000 year old mosaic floor

Almost 2,000 year old mosaic floor

Pauls Prison (?)

Pauls Prison (?)

Ruins at Philippi

Ruins at Philippi

Pieces of ruins found at Philippi

Pieces of ruins found at Philippi

Part of the Via Egnatia

Part of the Via Egnatia

Posted in Greece, Paul, photography, UMC