Full Moon Names 2018

Each year since 2004, Space.com has provided a listing of full moon names that date back to a few centuries ago, when Native Americans occupied the region that’s now the northern and eastern United States. Those tribes of long ago kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred.

There were some variations in these moon names, but in general, the same ones were used by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers who arrived in those areas followed their own customs and created some of their own names. Because the lunar (“synodic”) month is roughly 29.5 days long on average, the dates of these full moons shift from year to year.

Here is a listing of all of the full moon names, as well as their dates and times for 2018. Unless otherwise noted, all times are for the Eastern time zone.

Amid the bitter cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Native American villages. It was also known as the Old Moon or the Moon After Yule. Some tribes called it the Full Snow Moon.

The moon reaches fullness at 9:24 p.m. EST and will arrive at perigee (its closest point to Earth in its orbit) about 4.5 hours earlier, at 5:00 p.m. EST, at a distance of 221,559 miles (356,565 kilometers) from Earth. (A full moon that takes place during perigee is sometimes known as a supermoon.) Because the full moon coincides with perigee, it will appear to be the biggest full moon of 2018. In addition, very high ocean tides can be expected during the two or three days after peak fullness. 

Usually this title is reserved for a full moon in February, since  world tends to be fully coated in snow by then. But this year is an oddity, in that there will be no full moon in February. (This is true for most locations on Earth, but in some places, including eastern Asia and eastern Australia, the moment of peak fullness will occur on the morning of Feb. 1.) During February, the snow and bitter cold makes hunting difficult, so some tribes called this moon the Full Hunger Moon.

This is the second time the moon turns full in a calendar month, so it is also popularly known as a Blue Moon. On average, full moons occur every 29.53 days (the length of the synodic month), or 12.37 times per year. So months containing two full moons occur, on average, every 2.72 years. This year, however, is a striking exception to this rule, as you will soon see.

Jan. 31 will also be the night of a total lunar eclipse.The Pacific Rim — the lands around the rim of the Pacific Ocean— will have a ringside seat for this event: Totality will last 77 minutes, and at mideclipse, the moon will appear directly overhead (or nearly so) over the open waters of the western Pacific Ocean.

In the western U.S. and western Canada, the eclipse will take place during the predawn hours, but across the rest of North America, the progress of the eclipse will be interrupted by moonset.

This occurrence happens once every 19 years. The last time February didn’t have a full moon was in 1999, and the time before that was 1980; the next time there will be no full moon in February will be 2037. (Once again, this is true for most locations on Earth, but in some places, including eastern Asia and eastern Australia, the moment of peak fullness will occur on the morning of Feb. 1.)

In March, the ground softens, and the earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of the robins. The Northern tribes knew this as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signals the end of winter, or the Full Crust Moon because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. Fullness occurs at 7:51 p.m. EST(0051 GMT on March 2).

Marking the time of tapping maple trees, this is another variation of the Full Worm Moon. In 2018, this is also the Paschal Full Moon, or the first full moon of the spring season. The first Sunday following the Paschal Moon is Easter Sunday, which indeed will be observed the very next day, on Sunday, April 1. This is also the second Blue Moon of 2018 — once again, depending your location, because the moon reaches peak fullness on April 1 for some locations. Fullness occurs at 8:37 a.m. EDT (0037 GMT on April 1.)

One of the earliest-blooming, widespread flowers in North America is the grass pink or wild ground phlox. Other names for this full moon are the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon and, to some coastal tribes, the Full Fish Moon, to mark when the shad come upstream to spawn. Fullness occurs at 8:58 p.m. EDT (0058 GMT on April 30).

By this time of year, flowers are abundant. The Full Flower Moon was also known as the Full Corn Planting Moon or the Milk Moon. Fullness occurs at 10:20 a.m. EDT (1420 GMT).

Strawberry-picking season peaks this month. Europeans called this the Rose Moon. Fullness occurs at 12:58 a.m. EDT (1658 GMT).

This full moon occursin the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out from their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, because it’s when thunderstorms are the most frequent in this part of the world. Sometimes, it’s also called the Full Hay Moon.

There will also be a total eclipse of the moon on July 27. However, it will not be visible in North America because it will be happening during the daytime, when the moon is below the horizon. Much of the Eastern Hemisphere — from Europe and Africa, eastward across Asia to Japan, Indonesia and much of Australasia — will be able to watch this rather exceptionally long totality, which will last 103 minutes. Because the moon arrives at apogee (its farthest point from Earth in its orbit) about 14 hours earlier, this will also be the smallestfull moon of 2018; it will appear 12.3 percent smaller than the full moon of Jan. 1. Fullness occurs at 4:20 p.m. EDT (2020 GMT); the eclipse will peak at 3:21 EDT (1921 GMT).

This full moon occurswhen this large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, like Lake Champlain, are most readily caught. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon, because when the moon rises, it looks reddish through the sultry summer haze. It is also known as the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon.Fullness occurs at 7:56 a.m. EDT (1156 GMT).

Traditionally, this designation goes to the full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal (fall) equinox. The Harvest Moon usually comes in September, but (on average) once or twice per decade, it will fall in early October. At the peak of the harvest, farmers can work into the night by the light of this moon. Usually, the moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later each night across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans and wild rice — the chief Native American staples — are now ready for gathering. Fullness occurs at 10:52 p.m. EDT (0252 GMT on Sept. 25).

With the leaves falling and the deer fattened, it’s now time to hunt. Because the fields have been reaped, hunters can ride over the stubble and more easily see foxes, as well as other animals, which can be caught for a banquet after the harvest. Fullness occurs at 12:45 p.m. EDT (1645 GMT).  

At this point of the year, it’s time to set beaver traps before the swamps freeze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now active in their preparation for winter. It’s also called the Frosty Moon. Fullness occurs at 12:39 a.m. EST (0539 GMT).

It’s not hard to understand where the name of this moon comes from, as December is the month in which the winter cold fastens its grip on this part of the world. On occasion, this moon was also called the Moon Before Yule. Sometimes, this moon is referred to as the Full Long Nights Moon, which is appropriate because the winter solstice (the longest night of the year) occurs in December, and the moon is above the horizon for a long time. In December in the Northern Hemisphere, the full moon makes its highest arc across the sky because it’s diametrically opposite to the low sun. In fact, the moment of the winter solstice comes just over 19 hours before this full moon, at 5:23 p.m. EST on Dec. 21. Peak fullness occurs at 12:49 p.m. EST (1749 GMT).

 

Posted in moon, outdoor, photography

My Favorite Images of 2017

Each year I try to do a “Top Ten Images” type of thing. So over the past several days I have looked back on images taken throughout 2017 and have pulled out my favorite ones. Now these are not necessarily my best work, but ones I like for one reason or another.

There is no way this was an easy task. I certainly had many images that could immediately get thrown out but, at least in my mind, I had quite a few more than twelve that I might call “favorite”. Nonetheless I have come up with what I consider my 12 favorite images from this year of 2017. I look forward to seeing your comments and if you think a different image of mine should have been included, let me know.

So now, here in no certain order, are my picks for my 12 favorite images of 2017 (and if you count you will see that it is really a “bakers dozen”):

Posted in art and entertainment, photography

2018 Lunar Calendar

New lunar calendar just for you!  Here are the dates of the moon’s phases for 2018, according to NASA. Times and dates are in Eastern U.S. time.

Moon phases (Full Moon) 2018

Moon phase
Date
Time
Full moon January 1, 2018 07:25:29 PM
Last quarter January 8, 2018 03:26:33 PM
New moon January 16, 2018 07:18:18 PM
First quarter January 24, 2018 03:20:33 PM
Full moon January 31, 2018 06:27:46 AM
Last quarter February 7, 2018 08:55:49 AM
New moon February 15, 2018 02:06:51 PM
First quarter February 23, 2018 01:09:21 AM
Full moon March 1, 2018 05:52:10 PM
Last quarter March 9, 2018 04:22:54 AM
New moon March 17, 2018 06:14:19 AM
First quarter March 24, 2018 08:35:52 AM
Full moon March 31, 2018 05:37:47 AM
Last quarter April 8, 2018 12:21:01 AM
New moon April 15, 2018 06:59:53 PM
First quarter April 22, 2018 02:46:50 PM
Full moon April 29, 2018 05:59:14 PM
Last quarter May 7, 2018 07:11:34 PM
New moon May 15, 2018 04:49:49 AM
First quarter May 21, 2018 08:50:39 PM
Full moon May 29, 2018 07:20:48 AM
Last quarter June 6, 2018 11:34:08 AM
New moon June 13, 2018 12:45:04 PM
First quarter June 20, 2018 03:52:34 AM
Full moon June 27, 2018 09:54:35 PM
Last quarter July 6, 2018 12:52:49 AM
New moon July 12, 2018 07:49:35 PM
First quarter July 19, 2018 12:53:57 PM
Full moon July 27, 2018 01:22:19 PM
Last quarter August 4, 2018 11:19:50 AM
New moon August 11, 2018 02:59:07 AM
First quarter August 18, 2018 12:49:54 AM
Full moon August 26, 2018 04:58:24 AM
Last quarter September 2, 2018 07:39:10 PM
New moon September 9, 2018 11:02:41 AM
First quarter September 16, 2018 04:16:05 PM
Full moon September 24, 2018 07:54:49 PM
Last quarter October 2, 2018 02:47:15 AM
New moon October 8, 2018 08:47:50 PM
First quarter October 16, 2018 11:02:29 AM
Full moon October 24, 2018 09:47:34 AM
Last quarter October 31, 2018 09:42:27 AM
New moon November 7, 2018 09:02:52 AM
First quarter November 15, 2018 07:54:29 AM
Full moon November 22, 2018 10:41:26 PM
Last quarter November 29, 2018 05:21:18 PM
New moon December 7, 2018 12:21:42 AM
First quarter December 15, 2018 04:49:37 AM
Full moon December 22, 2018 10:50:27 AM
Last quarter December 29, 2018 02:36:42 AM

 

Phases of the moon

The moon, like Earth, is a sphere, and it is always half-illuminated by the sun. However, as the moon travels around Earth, we see more or less of the illuminated half. The moon’s phases describe how much of the moon’s disk is illuminated from our perspective.

New moon: The moon is between Earth and the sun, and the side of the moon facing toward us receives no direct sunlight; it is lit only by dim sunlight reflected from Earth.

Waxing crescent: As the moon moves around Earth, the side we can see gradually becomes more illuminated by direct sunlight.

First quarter: The moon is 90 degrees away from the sun in the sky and is half-illuminated from our point of view. We call it “first quarter” because the moon has traveled about a quarter of the way around Earth since the new moon.

Waxing gibbous: The area of illumination continues to increase. More than half of the moon’s face appears to be getting sunlight.

Full moon: The moon is 180 degrees away from the sun and is as close as it can be to being fully illuminated by the sun from our perspective. The sun, Earth and the moon are aligned, but because the moon’s orbit is not exactly in the same plane as Earth’s orbit around the sun, they rarely form a perfect line. When they do, we have a lunar eclipse as Earth’s shadow crosses the moon’s face.

Waning gibbous: More than half of the moon’s face appears to be getting sunlight, but the amount is decreasing.

Last quarter: The moon has moved another quarter of the way around Earth, to the third quarter position. The sun’s light is now shining on the other half of the visible face of the moon.

Waning crescent: Less than half of the moon’s face appears to be getting sunlight, and the amount is decreasing.

Finally, the moon is back to its new moon starting position. Now, the moon is between Earth and the sun. Usually the moon passes above or below the sun from our vantage point, but occasionally it passes right in front of the sun, and we get a solar eclipse.

Posted in art and entertainment, moon

All About Orbs

One fall day in 2009, I was reading through some of the forums at www.photoshopelementsuser.com when I came across some information posted by a lady from the UK named Wendy Williams. Wendy was telling forum members how she had taken photographs and created some “orbs”. These “orbs” were supposed to look likewhat you would see reflected in a gazing ball placed in a garden. She also posted a number of examples. Additionally, Wendy posted step-by-step instructions so anyone interested could create the same “orbs”. Well, I was indeed interested. I took Wendy’s instructions and created a few of these “orbs”. I was addicted after the first attempt!

If you would like to learn how to make your own orbs, there are video and written tutorials on this website. Click on “Tutorials” in the menu bar above, or just click this link.

Below are some of my “orbs”. You can see others in my Orb gallery.  If you are interested you can join my Orb Group on Facebook, here’s the link to that: https://www.facebook.com/groups/181794065304487/

orange zinnia orb morris island lighthouse frax orb firebird orb dos equis orb daffodils orb coconuts orb floral orb

Posted in abstract, Digital Art, flowers, Folly Beach, orbs

Fine-art Food

Try turning your dinner ingredients into photo art using just a lightbox and a very sharp knife. Slice fruit and vegetables as thinly and evenly as possible, then place them on the lightbox. With the camera positioned directly above, use Live View to focus manually on the details. Set an aperture of f/8 to give adequate depth of field, and dial in some exposure compensation of +1 to +3 stops as the bright light can fool the camera’s meter into underexposure.

food photo

Posted in art and entertainment, Fun Stuff

Worldwide Photowalk 2017

This past Saturday, October 7th, I got up early and drove to Southport, North Carolina, and participated in of Scott Kelby’s Workwide Photowalk. On the first Saturday of October each year, photographers and enthusiasts around the world get out their cameras and meet up at a designated location in their town to walk around and take photographs, socialize, make new friends, win prizes and be a part of a great cause during Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photowalk®. This year was particularly special because it marks the 10th Anniversary of the Worldwide Photowalk®. Some of my friends from the St James Plantation Photo Club and from the Coastal Carolina Camera Club were attending and had asked me to join in with them.  Other camera bugs from the surrounding area participated as well.

Founded in the mid-1700s with the establishment of Fort Johnston, and officially designated as the town of Southport in 1792, this coastal community is dotted with centuries of history around every corner. Visitors will find a myriad of ways to soak up the local legends and stories via walking tours, bus / vehicle tours, and even boat tours, or can set out on their own adventure by popping by some of the town’s quintessential sites. The Fort Johnston Museum & Visitors Center offers an inside glimpse into the fort’s 250+ year history, (as well as plenty of visitor information for newcomers), while the Old Brunswick County Jail is a fascinating jail-turned-museum that operated for 70 years after it was first built in 1904. For a far-reaching perspective of the local culture, head to the NC Maritime Museum which features artifacts from the Civil War, the American Revolution, and even the original Native American residents. Suffice it to say, in a town as old and historically rich as Southport, history can be uncovered around every corner.

Here are a few images I made from this years Photowalk.

casting casting skelton anchor shrimper shrimpers

Posted in art and entertainment, outdoor, photography, Shrimp Boats, travel

Great Christmas Present Ideas

OK, Christmas will be here before you know it and even folks who do not celebrate the birth of our Lord and savior, Jesus Christ, will still participate in gift exchanges.  What to gift? That can be a difficult question. Did you know that my photography can become your gift and in many shapes and forms, not just a 8×10 glossy (although you can do that too). 

Here are some examples of a few of the products you can purchase and solve your Christmas dilemma. 

Tote bags are always handy for trips to the beach and just running daily errands. Here are two examples.

Lily Tote Bag Bull Island Tote Bag

Coffee Cups are available to two sizes.

 

Coffee Cup

Greeting Cards are always a hit and you can order as few as one!

Greeting Card

 

Everyone has a cell phone these days, and who wouldn’t like a unique cell phone protective cover?

Phone Case

Throw pillows can add to the decor of any home. Throw Pillow

In addition to regular prints you can get canvas prints, acrylic prints, or even wood prints as shown here.

Wood Print

How do yo get these fabulous items? In the header at the top of this page, click on “Purchase”. or simply go to InletImages.com and find the images you want. Happy shopping and thank you for your continued support!

Posted in Christmas, huntington beach, inlet images, marshwalk, murrells inlet, Night photography, photography, UMC

Why Amazon Warehouse Deals is Awesome!

When people ask me were to find great deals online, I typically tell them about warehouse deals. The majority of people I speak with have never heard of it, yet they have Amazon accounts. I think this is a great opportunity to find great deals on products that you want or need. Yes, you do have to be careful of what you order, but if you find the right product condition, then you will most likely be OK. Amazon has warehouse deals for many great and popular categories like consumer electronics, baby products, sports & outdoor, home & garden, shoes, and much more.

You still get the same great service from Amazon, but you can save a good amount of money. When a friend bought a camera lens for his wife, he was able to save $75 off the regular price just because the shipping box was damaged. The lens had no issues and his wife loved the gift. Some products you can save 5%, while others you can save 40%. It really all depends on the item and how long Amazon has had it in their inventory. So, if you are looking for a good deal while shopping online, then check out Amazon warehouse deals!

Shop Amazon Warehouse Deals – Deep Discounts on Open-box and Used Electronics


 

Posted in art and entertainment

Along the Causeway

The causeway at Huntington Beach State Park is a great place even if you don’t have a lot of time. Today was another rainy, grey, dreary kind of day and I took advantage in a break in the rain to make a run to the causeway. It was also low tide so I was hopeful that there would be a lot of feeding activity from the local birds. I was also hopeful that I would see a Rosette Spoonbill as one has been seen the past several days.

Much to my disappointment there was not a lot of activity AND the Spoonbill had not made an appearance, at least not while I was there. I was able to get a few shots and thought I would share them with you.

swimming gator gator head observation deck egret ibis orb spider

Posted in art and entertainment, huntington beach, inlet images, murrells inlet, outdoor, South Carolina, state park

Seville Spain

While visiting Seville, Spain this spring, we were able to see the Plaza de España. The Plaza was built for the Ibero-American Exhibition of 1929 (Expo 29) and includes 48 alcoves with benches, one for each province of Spain, each with a relevant tableau and map, all designed on colourful azulejos (painted ceramic tiles). Spanish tourists have photographs taken of themselves with family and friends on their home province’s bench. Everywhere you look is some fantastic artwork. The ceilings, the walls, murals, even the floors are all works of art. Shown below is just one ceiling shot I took. Stay tuned, I will post more soon!

seville ceiling

Posted in art and entertainment, spain