Different Strokes ……

We have all heard the phrase “Different strokes for different folks” or “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” or “One persons treasure is another persons junk”. All of this is true with art also. Artistic creativity has many ways of expressing itself and often is dependant on the mood of the artist at the time. Back in the days of film photography (yes I know it still exists) many folks altered their photographs in the darkroom. Nowadays the digital darkroom makes some of these manipulations easier.

Still, what one person likes another will turn their nose up at. Here are some examples. The first image below is photo almost “straight out of camera”. All that has been done to it is a little sharpening and a little increased vibrance, nothing major by any means. The images following that one are different presentations of the original. 

Not everybody will like all the variants. Some of you will most likely like several of the edits and maybe some will even like all of the presentations. Clicking on any image will allow you a larger view. Wherever your tastes may fall I hope you can enjoy them.

ursula ursula ursula ursula ursula ursula

Posted in Digital Art, Fun Stuff, photography

Pineapples of Moorea

Pineapples may be cultivated from a crown cutting of the fruit, possibly flowering in 5-10 months and fruiting in the following six months. Pineapples do not ripen significantly after harvest.

Pineapples can be consumed fresh, cooked, juiced, or preserved. They are found in a wide array of cuisines. In addition to consumption, the pineapple leaves are used to produce the textile fiber piña in the Philippines, commonly used as the material for the men’s barong Tagalog and women’s baro’t saya formalwear in the country. The fiber is also used as a component for wallpaper and other furnishings.

The flesh and juice of the pineapple are used in cuisines around the world. In many tropical countries, pineapple is prepared and sold on roadsides as a snack. It is sold whole or in halves with a stick inserted. Whole, cored slices with a cherry in the middle are a common garnish on hams in the West. Chunks of pineapple are used in desserts such as fruit salad, as well as in some savory dishes, including pizza toppings, or as a grilled ring on a hamburger. Crushed pineapple is used in yogurt, jam, sweets, and ice cream. The juice of the pineapple is served as a beverage, and it is also the main ingredient in cocktails such as the piña colada.

While on the island of Moorea last spring we took a tour that (among other places) went through a pineapple field. Below are a couple of images of what pineapples in the field look like and a third picture that I took just to be a little different. Click on the image to have a larger view. Hope you enjoy them.

pineapple

pineapple

pineapple

Posted in French Polynesia, outdoor, photography

Belin Memorial UMC Garden

I am a member of Belin (pronounced Blaine) Memorial United Methodist Church. It sits right on the inlet of Murrells Inlet and is quite a famous landmark. There is a garden area between the Family Life Center and the cemetery and this garden is tended to by a group of volunteers. These gardening volunteers do a wonderful job year round. 

Although it is still February I was surprised with all the color in our garden. Several different varieties of daffodils, gerbia daisys, and other assorted colorful blooms. 

Pictured below are some of the Gerbia Daisys I found there. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

(click on image for larger view)

yellow gerbias

 

#murrellsinlet, #belin, #discoversc, #southcarolina, #canon, #myrtlebeach, #mymyrtlebeach, 

Posted in Belin, flowers, garden, murrells inlet, outdoor, photography, South Carolina, UMC

Myrtle Beach Skywheel

SkyWheel is a 187-foot tall (57.0 m) Ferris wheel in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.
When it opened on 20 May 2011 it was the second-tallest extant Ferris wheel in North America, after the 212-foot (64.6 m) Texas Star in Dallas, and the tallest wheel in the United States east of the Mississippi River.
It is similar in design to the Niagara SkyWheel on Canada’s side of Niagara Falls, and the Seattle Great Wheel, both of which are 175 feet (53.3 m) tall.
Skywheel has 42 glass-enclosed, temperature controlled gondolas described as “ballooned-out square”, each with seating for six passengers.
The wheel operates year-round. Though the wheel itself can withstand 135 MPH winds, the gondolas must be removed if high winds are predicted, a process that takes eight to ten hours.

Below are two images of the skywheel. The second one is a little “abstract” version form when I was in a playful mood recently. Click on each one for a larger view.

 

skywheel

abstract

 

#DiscoverSC #southcarolina #southernliving #myrtlebeach #mymyrtlebeach

Posted in art and entertainment, Digital Art, photography Tagged |

Full Moon Calendar 2017

Yesterday, January 12th, was the first full moon of 2017. Yesterday was also the first time this year I was asked “When is the next full moon?” 

Many cultures have given distinct names to each recurring full moon. The names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. The Farmer’s Almanac lists several names that are commonly used in the United States. The almanac explains that there were some variations in the moon names, but in general, the same ones were used among the Algonquin tribes from New England on west to Lake Superior. European settlers followed their own customs and created some of their own names.

This is when full moons will occur in 2017, according to NASA:

Date Name U.S. East UTC
Jan. 12 Wolf Moon 6:34 a.m. 11:34
Feb. 10 Snow Moon 7:33 p.m. 00:33 (2/11)
Mar. 12 Worm Moon 10:54 a.m. 15:54
Apr. 11 Pink Moon 2:08 a.m. 07:08
May 10 Flower Moon 5:43 p.m. 22:43
June 9 Strawberry Moon 9:10 a.m. 14:10
July 9 Buck Moon 12:07 a.m. 05:07
Aug. 7 Sturgeon Moon 2:11 p.m. 19:11
Sept. 6 Harvest Moon 3:03 a.m. 08:03
Oct. 5 Hunter’s Moon 2:40 p.m. 19:40
Nov. 4 Beaver Moon 12:23 a.m. 05:23
Dec. 3 Cold Moon 10:47 a.m. 15:47

 

Other Native American people had different names. In the book “This Day in North American Indian History” (Da Capo Press, 2002), author Phil Konstantin lists more than 50 native peoples and their names for full moons. He also lists them on his website, AmericanIndian.net.

Full moon names often correspond to seasonal markers, so a Harvest Moon occurs at the end of the growing season, in September, and the Cold Moon occurs in frosty December. At least, that’s how it works in the Northern Hemisphere.

In the Southern Hemisphere, where the seasons are switched, the Harvest Moon occurs in March and the Cold Moon is in June. According to Earthsky.org, these are common names for full moons south of the equator.

January: Hay Moon, Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Mead Moon
February (mid-summer): Grain Moon, Sturgeon Moon, Red Moon, Wyrt Moon, Corn Moon, Dog Moon, Barley Moon
March: Harvest Moon, Corn Moon
April: Harvest Moon, Hunter’s Moon, Blood Moon
May: Hunter’s Moon, Beaver Moon, Frost Moon
June: Oak Moon, Cold Moon, Long Night’s Moon
July: Wolf Moon, Old Moon, Ice Moon
August: Snow Moon, Storm Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon
September: Worm Moon, Lenten Moon, Crow Moon, Sugar Moon, Chaste Moon, Sap Moon
October: Egg Moon, Fish Moon, Seed Moon, Pink Moon, Waking Moon
November: Corn Moon, Milk Moon, Flower Moon, Hare Moon
December: Strawberry Moon, Honey Moon, Rose Moon

Here is a shot I took of last nights Wolf Moon – Aooooooooo

Wolf Moon

Wolf Moon, 1/12/17

Posted in moon, murrells inlet, outdoor, photography, South Carolina

Indoor Studio Still Life

When I feel like shooting still life, I will clean off my workbench in the garage and it becomes my indoor studio! Had some free time this morning and set things up and did a little still life shooting. I also took two of the floral shots and did an inversion on them in PS. Never had done this before but read about it somewhere and gave it a go. Some will like it, others will not. 

shells shell lily inverted lily inverted

dragons

Posted in art and entertainment, Fun Stuff, photography

My Favorite Images of 2016

I had been thinking of doing a “Top Ten Images” type of thing but had been procrastinating. Then a few days ago my friend Mary Presson Roberts over at TheMerryPhotographer.com posted her “Favorite Images of 2016“. After reading her latest post, I became inspired to get off my butt (so to speak) and pick out my favorite 12 to share with you.

There is no way this was an easy task. I certainly had many images that could immediately get thrown out but, at least in my mind, I had quite a few more than twelve that I might call “favorite”. Nonetheless I have come up with what I consider my 12 favorite images from this year of 2016. I look forward to seeing your comments and if you think a different image of mine should have been included, let me know.

So now, here in no certain order, are my picks for my 12 favorite images of 2016:

bridge cross muses crater super moon soh boi fireworks marble common dolphin cornucopia

Posted in photography

Custom Coffee Mugs

Custom coffee mugs are now available from my website. Did you know that you can have a coffee mug with most any of my images on it? Simply go to my website http://inletimages.com choose your favorite photos. The mugs come in two sizes, your choice of 11oz or 15oz. Each coffee mug is custom manufactured using your selected image, shipped from the production facility within 1-2 days, and delivered to you with a 30-day money-back guarantee. If you have seen a photo here on my blog and do not see it on the website just ask me! Here are just a few examples:

coffee mug coffee mug coffee mug

Posted in art and entertainment

National D-Day Memorial

The National D-Day Memorial is located in Bedford, Virginia — the community suffering the highest per capita D-Day losses in the nation. The Memorial honors the Allied forces that participated in the invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944 during World War II.

With its stylized English Garden, haunting invasion tableau, and striking Victory Plaza, the Memorial stands as a powerful permanent tribute to the valor, fidelity, and sacrifice of D-Day participants. The Memorial is encompassed by the names of the 4,413 Allied soldiers who died in the invasion, the most complete list of its kind anywhere in the world.

Visitors can expect both an educational experience as well as an emotional one, as they walk the grounds at the Memorial and leave with a clear understanding of the scale and sacrifices made during the largest amphibious landing the world has ever seen. On June 6, 1944, 150,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. General Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 ships and 11,000 aircraft supported the invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in France. The D-Day cost was high with more than 9,000 Allied soldiers killed or wounded as the march across Europe to defeat Hitler began.

The Memorial is supported by contributions to the National D-Day Memorial Foundation a 501(c)(3) not-for profit organization.

Some photos I took while there are below:

National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial National D-Day Memorial

Posted in photography

Super Moon

Step outside on December 14, and take a look at the moon. Not only will the moon be full, but on that day, the moon will be at its closest point to our planet as it orbits Earth. This makes the December full moon a supermoon.

The term supermoon has entered popular consciousness in recent years. Originally a term from modern astrology for a new or full moon that occurs when the moon is within 90% of its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit, supermoon now refers more broadly to a full moon that is closer to Earth than average. But why is the moon closer to Earth at some times but not others?

Since the moon’s orbit is elliptical, one side (perigee) is about 30,000 miles (50,000 km) closer to Earth than the other (apogee). The word syzygy, in addition to being useful in word games, is the scientific name for when the Earth, sun, and moon line up as the moon orbits Earth. When perigee-syzygy of the Earth-moon-sun system occurs and the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun, we get a perigee moon or more commonly, a supermoon!

This coincidence happens three times in 2016. On October 16 and December 14, the moon becomes full on the same day as perigee. On November 14, it becomes full within about two hours of perigee—arguably making it an extra-super moon.

The full moon of November 14 was not only the closest full moon of 2016 but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century. The full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until November 25, 2034.

The supermoon of December 14 is remarkable for a different reason: it’s going to wipe out the view of the Geminid meteor shower. Bright moonlight will reduce the visibility of faint meteors five to ten fold, transforming the usually fantastic Geminids into an astronomical footnote. Sky watchers will be lucky to see a dozen Geminids per hour when the shower peaks. Oh well, at least the moon will be remarkable.

How remarkable?

A supermoon, or perigee full moon can be as much as 14% bigger and 30% brighter than an apogee full moon. However it’s not always easy to tell the difference. A 30% difference in brightness can easily be masked by clouds or the competing glare of urban lights. Also, there are no rulers floating in the sky to measure lunar diameters. Hanging high overhead with no reference points to provide a sense of scale, one full moon looks much like any other.

Low-hanging moons, on the other hand, can create what’s called a “moon illusion.” When the moon is near the horizon it can look unnaturally large when viewed through trees, buildings, or other foreground objects. The effect is an optical illusion, but that fact doesn’t take away from the experience.

A supermoon is undeniably beautiful as we saw on October 16 and this week November 14. We can see that beauty again on December 14: mark your calendar and enjoy the super moonlight.

super moon above princess super moon over crazy sister marina

Posted in art and entertainment, marshwalk, murrells inlet, Night photography, outdoor, South Carolina