Category Archives: art and entertainment

Along the Causeway

The causeway at Huntington Beach State Park is a great place even if you don’t have a lot of time. Today was another rainy, grey, dreary kind of day and I took advantage in a break in the rain to make a run to the causeway. It was also low tide so I was hopeful that there would be a lot of feeding activity from the local birds. I was also hopeful that I would see a Rosette Spoonbill as one has been seen the past several days.

Much to my disappointment there was not a lot of activity AND the Spoonbill had not made an appearance, at least not while I was there. I was able to get a few shots and thought I would share them with you.

swimming gator gator head observation deck egret ibis orb spider

Also posted in huntington beach, inlet images, murrells inlet, outdoor, South Carolina, state park

Seville Spain

While visiting Seville, Spain this spring, we were able to see the Plaza de España. The Plaza was built for the Ibero-American Exhibition of 1929 (Expo 29) and includes 48 alcoves with benches, one for each province of Spain, each with a relevant tableau and map, all designed on colourful azulejos (painted ceramic tiles). Spanish tourists have photographs taken of themselves with family and friends on their home province’s bench. Everywhere you look is some fantastic artwork. The ceilings, the walls, murals, even the floors are all works of art. Shown below is just one ceiling shot I took. Stay tuned, I will post more soon!

seville ceiling

Also posted in spain

Prague Gardens

While in Prague a couple of weeks ago, my wife and I explored the Prague Castle. However, before we toured the castle we took some time to visit the gardens outside the castle. There were blooms everywhere! 

The first image you see below you may have seen on my personal FaceBook page. After looking at it I thought it might be a good candidate for Fractalius treatment. I have not played with Fractalius for a while but think I like the result, seen in the second image below. 

prague gardens

prague gardens

The Royal Gardens are historically the most valuable of all the castle gardens. Founded in 1534 by Ferdinand I. Habsburg, they were inspired by Italian designs; the current form of the garden, however, follows the English adaptation of the 19th century. One of its greatest treasures is the Singing Fountain, one of the most beautiful fountains in Renaissance Europe. The southern gardens (Paradise, Ramparts and Hartig Gardens) spreading along the southern facade of the Prague Castle offer striking views of the Lesser Quarter, Old Town and nearby Petřín.

Also posted in Camera phone, flowers, outdoor

Travelling Cars

A friend recently sent a link to this posting of “travelling cars”. It is from an aspiring photographer, Kim Leuenberger, who works hard on bringing something unique to the world of photography, something we do not get to see every day in the never-ending sea of imagery on the Internet. 

Go see this post yourself. I think you will find it most fascinating.

Adventures of Traveling Cars by Kim Leuenberger

 

Also posted in photography

Myrtle Beach Skywheel

SkyWheel is a 187-foot tall (57.0 m) Ferris wheel in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.
When it opened on 20 May 2011 it was the second-tallest extant Ferris wheel in North America, after the 212-foot (64.6 m) Texas Star in Dallas, and the tallest wheel in the United States east of the Mississippi River.
It is similar in design to the Niagara SkyWheel on Canada’s side of Niagara Falls, and the Seattle Great Wheel, both of which are 175 feet (53.3 m) tall.
Skywheel has 42 glass-enclosed, temperature controlled gondolas described as “ballooned-out square”, each with seating for six passengers.
The wheel operates year-round. Though the wheel itself can withstand 135 MPH winds, the gondolas must be removed if high winds are predicted, a process that takes eight to ten hours.

Below are two images of the skywheel. The second one is a little “abstract” version form when I was in a playful mood recently. Click on each one for a larger view.

 

skywheel

abstract

 

#DiscoverSC #southcarolina #southernliving #myrtlebeach #mymyrtlebeach

Also posted in Digital Art, photography Tagged |

Indoor Studio Still Life

When I feel like shooting still life, I will clean off my workbench in the garage and it becomes my indoor studio! Had some free time this morning and set things up and did a little still life shooting. I also took two of the floral shots and did an inversion on them in PS. Never had done this before but read about it somewhere and gave it a go. Some will like it, others will not. 

shells shell lily inverted lily inverted

dragons

Also posted in Fun Stuff, photography

Custom Coffee Mugs

Custom coffee mugs are now available from my website. Did you know that you can have a coffee mug with most any of my images on it? Simply go to my website http://inletimages.com choose your favorite photos. The mugs come in two sizes, your choice of 11oz or 15oz. Each coffee mug is custom manufactured using your selected image, shipped from the production facility within 1-2 days, and delivered to you with a 30-day money-back guarantee. If you have seen a photo here on my blog and do not see it on the website just ask me! Here are just a few examples:

coffee mug coffee mug coffee mug

Super Moon

Step outside on December 14, and take a look at the moon. Not only will the moon be full, but on that day, the moon will be at its closest point to our planet as it orbits Earth. This makes the December full moon a supermoon.

The term supermoon has entered popular consciousness in recent years. Originally a term from modern astrology for a new or full moon that occurs when the moon is within 90% of its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit, supermoon now refers more broadly to a full moon that is closer to Earth than average. But why is the moon closer to Earth at some times but not others?

Since the moon’s orbit is elliptical, one side (perigee) is about 30,000 miles (50,000 km) closer to Earth than the other (apogee). The word syzygy, in addition to being useful in word games, is the scientific name for when the Earth, sun, and moon line up as the moon orbits Earth. When perigee-syzygy of the Earth-moon-sun system occurs and the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun, we get a perigee moon or more commonly, a supermoon!

This coincidence happens three times in 2016. On October 16 and December 14, the moon becomes full on the same day as perigee. On November 14, it becomes full within about two hours of perigee—arguably making it an extra-super moon.

The full moon of November 14 was not only the closest full moon of 2016 but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century. The full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until November 25, 2034.

The supermoon of December 14 is remarkable for a different reason: it’s going to wipe out the view of the Geminid meteor shower. Bright moonlight will reduce the visibility of faint meteors five to ten fold, transforming the usually fantastic Geminids into an astronomical footnote. Sky watchers will be lucky to see a dozen Geminids per hour when the shower peaks. Oh well, at least the moon will be remarkable.

How remarkable?

A supermoon, or perigee full moon can be as much as 14% bigger and 30% brighter than an apogee full moon. However it’s not always easy to tell the difference. A 30% difference in brightness can easily be masked by clouds or the competing glare of urban lights. Also, there are no rulers floating in the sky to measure lunar diameters. Hanging high overhead with no reference points to provide a sense of scale, one full moon looks much like any other.

Low-hanging moons, on the other hand, can create what’s called a “moon illusion.” When the moon is near the horizon it can look unnaturally large when viewed through trees, buildings, or other foreground objects. The effect is an optical illusion, but that fact doesn’t take away from the experience.

A supermoon is undeniably beautiful as we saw on October 16 and this week November 14. We can see that beauty again on December 14: mark your calendar and enjoy the super moonlight.

super moon above princess super moon over crazy sister marina

Also posted in marshwalk, murrells inlet, Night photography, outdoor, South Carolina

10 Essential Wildlife Photography Tips

It’s hard not to enjoy the beauty of nature and wildlife. Even animals that are fairly common in your area can be fun to watch and great subjects for wildlife photos. Of course, the problem with photographing wildlife is if you’ve never done it before, it can be difficult to know where to start. After all, it’s the basic fundamentals that will help you build a solid foundation for wildlife photography success.

Steve Perry is a long-time wildlife photographer, and he offers up 10 essential wildlife photography tips in the short video below. Each tip addresses the basics of photographing wildlife such that when you have an opportunity to capture an image of a wild animal, you’ll have the knowledge and skills to do so. Have a look, and learn what you can do to be a more successful wildlife photographer.

 

Bora Bora and Maui

I am combining our stops to Bora Bora and Maui because our stop in Bora Bora shoud be called Poura Poura! It rained hard all day long. We did take a tender from the ship to shore but quickly saw that we would soon resemble drowned rats if we stayed. We got underway early that evening and after five sea days arrived in Maui!

The last time I had been to Maui was in 1975 and I was looking forward to going up to the Haleakala crater.  The island of Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Native Hawaiian tradition gives the origin of the island’s name in the legend of Hawai’iloa, the navigator credited with discovery of the Hawaiian Islands. According to that legend, Hawai’iloa named the island of Maui after his son, who in turn was named for the demigod Maui. The earlier name of Maui was Ihikapalaumaewa. The Island of Maui is also called the “Valley Isle” for the large isthmus between its northwestern and southeastern volcanoes and the numerous large valleys carved into both mountains.

Haleakala Observatory is one of the most important observing sites in the world. Lying above the tropical inversion layer it experiences superb seeing conditions and dominant clear skies. The University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy has managed this site for over 4 decades as a location for conducting dedicated astrophysical experiments. In most cases these are programs that could not be conducted anywhere else on Earth.

The Silversword is an exceptionally rare and endangered plant native only to the island of Maui and the Big Island of Hawai’i (all other occurences being introductions). Silversword is itself a very unusual plant. A very striking silvery-light-green color, this almost metallic looking plant consists of very dense rosettes of yucca type leaves that radiate out from a base. The leaves are thick and taper to a point at the ends. These rosettes can range in size from a few inches for babies to three or four feet for mature healthy adults.

However, what is really strange about Silversword is how it flowers. Silversword will live for 40 to 50 years before flowering once and only once. When it is time to flower the leaves seem to invert and bend upwards and out of the center rises a huge 4 to 6 foot stalk from which radiates hundreds of drooping yellow flowers. The entire result is something that resembles a narrow 6-foot tall mushroom – a very impressive sight. Once the plant has flowered a single time, the entire plant dies.

We left Maui late evening and set sail for Honolulu where our cruise ended. Stay tuned!

Welcome

Welcome

Park Sign

Park Sign

Silver Sword

Silver Sword

Silver Sword

Silver Sword

Observatory

Observatory

Observatory

Observatory

Crater

Haleakala Crater

Crater

Haleakala Crater

Crater

Haleakala Crater

Also posted in Cruise, French Polynesia, Hawaii, Maui