Category Archives: inlet images

Along the Causeway

The causeway at Huntington Beach State Park is a great place even if you don’t have a lot of time. Today was another rainy, grey, dreary kind of day and I took advantage in a break in the rain to make a run to the causeway. It was also low tide so I was hopeful that there would be a lot of feeding activity from the local birds. I was also hopeful that I would see a Rosette Spoonbill as one has been seen the past several days.

Much to my disappointment there was not a lot of activity AND the Spoonbill had not made an appearance, at least not while I was there. I was able to get a few shots and thought I would share them with you.

swimming gator gator head observation deck egret ibis orb spider

Also posted in art and entertainment, huntington beach, murrells inlet, outdoor, South Carolina, state park

Marshwalk Sunset

Yesterday I decided to capture sunset. It didn’t look like the sky would cooperate, it was almost too clear. I decided to go to the Marshwalk here in Murrells Inlet and see what the view from Veterans Pier would offer. As soon as I got there I thought “this was a mistake”, but I walked on out the pier anyway. Facing the marina, with the sunset in the background, it didn’t look very promising. A group of old pillings offered a nice reflection. Then I turned around, looking towards Goat Island and saw what you see in the second image below. There was a tinge of pink in the sky and I thought I could maybe bring that out by using a Grad ND Filter. Then, just for the heck of it, I turned the filter upside down. I took the resulting image into Topaz Adjust and the third image you see is that result of that!

After shooting Goat Island I was ready to get in out of the cold, but as I readied to leave I saw that sunset was not quite the “bust” I thought. The fourth image is last nights (1/11/2016) sunset as seen over Crazy Sister Marina.

 

Marshwalk-Pilings-web Goat-Island-No-Filter-web Goat-Island-Sunset-Filter-web Sunset-Over-Crazy-Sister-web

Also posted in art and entertainment, marshwalk, murrells inlet Tagged , , |

Wood Storks and Ibis

Late yesterday afternoon I went to the causeway at Huntington Beach State Park to shoot the sunset. I went a little early with the hope of being able to shoot some of the many birds and ‘gators that frequent the area. Tucked back away off to the side I spotted these Wood Storks looking for their dinner. A close look showed that the Wood Storks had been joined by two Ibis!

Click image for larger view:

Wood-Storks-and-2-Ibis-web

Also posted in bird, causeway, huntington beach, murrells inlet, outdoor, photography Tagged , , , , , , |

“U” is for

“U” is for UNIQUE. And what could be more unique than your very own cell phone case with one of my images? WOW! Would your friends be green with envy? Well you can get a case for an iPhone 4/4s/5/5c/5s or a Galaxy S4 or S5 with any of my images that appear on http://www.inletimages.com  Now obviously the images that are in a portrait style might work better than the ones on a landscape style, but you can move and crop to meet your desire!

Below is an example of a Galaxy S5 case with my “Lenten Cross” image. Check it out!

 

cellphonecase-web

Also posted in Camera phone, Project A-Z

“L” is for

Well “L” has to be for LOVE! 

Love can be demonstrated in so many ways. There is the love you have for a neighbor, the love you have for a parent, the love you have for a child. We are probably quick to think of the love we have for a spouse.

Often times we are quick to forget the love that God has for us. Today I was studying 1 John, in preparation for this weeks Disciple class, and verses 9-10 really jumped out at me and also caused me to think of the image shown below. I hope it speaks to your heart too.

9 By this the love of God was manifested in us, that God has sent His only begotten Son into the world so that we might live through Him. 10 In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins.…

Clicking the image will show a larger view:

 

Cross-at-the-Inlet-With-Moon-web

 

Also posted in art and entertainment, Belin, murrells inlet, Night photography, outdoor, Project A-Z, UMC

“J” is for

Jacks – as in Drunken Jacks!   One of Murrells Inlet’s fabulous eateries is named Drunken Jacks. The name is derived from a legend of a drunken pirate and like many legends there are variations depending on who is telling the tale. Here is my version:

In the 1600’s bands of pirates and privateers roamed the Carolinas, Florida and the Caribbean in search of ships laden with treasure. One of the most infamous was Edward Teach, better known as “Blackbeard”.  According to legend, Blackbeard stopped at a small island just off Murrells Inlet to bury a load of surplus hijacked rum. Of course some of the rum was kept above ground and the pirate crew celebrated quite heartily afterwards, feasting on oysters and shrimps and washed down with massive quantities of rum. Gradually a drunken stupor overtook the crew and they slept the night away. The next morning they boarded their ship and sailed away, forgetting about a crewman named Jack who was still “sleeping it off”. Eventually Jack was missed but by this time Blackbeards ship was being chased deep into the Caribbean. Eventually (some say two years later) the ship and crew found their way back to Murrells Inlet and decided to dig up their treasure of rum and check on Jack. What they found were 32 empty rum casks scattered up and down the beach and over by the myrtle and palmetto scrubs they discovered the bleached bones of “Old Jack”. Hence the name ‘Drunken Jacks Island”.  And that my friends is my version of this historic legend!

 

Drunken-Jacks-web

Also posted in marshwalk, murells inlet, Project A-Z

Murrells Inlet

Murrells Inlet is my home! Everybody likes to brag about their home, and guess what — Murrells Inlet is legendary!   It’s the place where hushpuppies were invented, where Blackbeard and other pirates of the high seas stashed their ill-gotten booty. It’s the place where local and visitor alike have reported the chance meeting with one of the Inlet’s local ghosts.   History in our community began writing itself long before this area was officially named Murrells Inlet by the post office in 1913. The origin of this name remains a mystery with theories resting in passed-down legends of pirates and fishermen and incomplete records of landowners, plats and maps. 

By the 1700s, scores of pirates had taken to the high seas to intercept cargo vessels and make off with the goods.  The South Carolina coastal waters were especially productive for pirates and the coves and inlets along Murrells Inlet provided great hiding places for those marauders.

Pirates who became local legends include Edward Teach, also known as Blackbeard because of his coal-black beard, and Drunken Jack, who was left behind on an island with a huge stash of stolen rum (and died with a smile on his face).

Our history includes Native American tribes, 16th century Spanish explorers and English colonists.  By the 1800s successful rice plantations were producing almost 47 million pounds of rice and were more successful than the tobacco  and cotton plantations of the Southeast.

People who summered in Murrells Inlet in the 1800s generally traveled by steamboat docking at the Wachesaw River Landing.  The river steamboats were known for excellent food and many of the steamboats’ cooks settled in Murrells Inlet, giving the area a reputation for savory cuisine long ago.

Yep – Murrells Inlet is where I call home! If you have not ever been here, you owe it to yourself to visit at least once. Put us on your “bucket list”!

This image was from the afternoon of 11 October 2013, click it for larger view:

Stormy Inlet

 

Also posted in Black and White, murrells inlet, photography, South Carolina

Day 234

Was down along the marshwalk this afternoon, behind Drunkin’ Jacks, watching the goats on Goat Island. Some were playing a goat game and others were looking for food. This guy was up a tree licking something on the tree branch. 

Also posted in marshwalk, photography, Project 365

Day 56

Went over to Veterans Pier this afternoon. The mid-day light was not the best for photography, but the tide was right for pelicans and other birds to be fishing for a meal. It was fairly cloudy but just as I got there, the clouds blew away. Was fortunate to get some “aerial” photography!  Here are a couple for you to enjoy:





http://www.inletimages.com

Also posted in flight, Folly Beach, murrells inlet, pelican, South Carolina

Spectacled Owl

Here is another beautiful owl we saw at the Birds of Prey exhibit. It is a Spectacled Owl, mostly found in southern Mexico, Central America, Northern two-thirds of South America.


Spectacled Owls are dark brown with a whitish to yellow-ochre belly, a white patch on the front of the neck and a dark brown belt across the breast. White “spectacles” around their yellow eyes give them their name.
A juvenile has the adult markings in reverse – a white head with black mask, and may take several years from hatching to attain full adult plumage.  An unsociable bird. Generally nocturnal, with activity normally begining after dusk and continuing to dawn. Roosts singly by day in trees with dense foliage. Most vocal on calm, moonlit nights.

Spectacled Owls eat small mammals including mice and the occasional possum or skunk, insects, spiders, many Caterpillars, bats, birds up to the size of Jays, crabs and frogs.
They use a branch to perch on and scan the surrounding area. When prey is located, they drop with a swift pounce. Insects are snatched from foliage.

Also posted in Brids of Prey, Owl, South Carolina