Category Archives: murrells inlet

Great Christmas Present Ideas

OK, Christmas will be here before you know it and even folks who do not celebrate the birth of our Lord and savior, Jesus Christ, will still participate in gift exchanges.  What to gift? That can be a difficult question. Did you know that my photography can become your gift and in many shapes and forms, not just a 8×10 glossy (although you can do that too). 

Here are some examples of a few of the products you can purchase and solve your Christmas dilemma. 

Tote bags are always handy for trips to the beach and just running daily errands. Here are two examples.

Lily Tote Bag Bull Island Tote Bag

Coffee Cups are available to two sizes.

 

Coffee Cup

Greeting Cards are always a hit and you can order as few as one!

Greeting Card

 

Everyone has a cell phone these days, and who wouldn’t like a unique cell phone protective cover?

Phone Case

Throw pillows can add to the decor of any home. Throw Pillow

In addition to regular prints you can get canvas prints, acrylic prints, or even wood prints as shown here.

Wood Print

How do yo get these fabulous items? In the header at the top of this page, click on “Purchase”. or simply go to InletImages.com and find the images you want. Happy shopping and thank you for your continued support!

Also posted in Christmas, huntington beach, inlet images, marshwalk, Night photography, photography, UMC

Along the Causeway

The causeway at Huntington Beach State Park is a great place even if you don’t have a lot of time. Today was another rainy, grey, dreary kind of day and I took advantage in a break in the rain to make a run to the causeway. It was also low tide so I was hopeful that there would be a lot of feeding activity from the local birds. I was also hopeful that I would see a Rosette Spoonbill as one has been seen the past several days.

Much to my disappointment there was not a lot of activity AND the Spoonbill had not made an appearance, at least not while I was there. I was able to get a few shots and thought I would share them with you.

swimming gator gator head observation deck egret ibis orb spider

Also posted in art and entertainment, huntington beach, inlet images, outdoor, South Carolina, state park

Belin Memorial UMC Garden

I am a member of Belin (pronounced Blaine) Memorial United Methodist Church. It sits right on the inlet of Murrells Inlet and is quite a famous landmark. There is a garden area between the Family Life Center and the cemetery and this garden is tended to by a group of volunteers. These gardening volunteers do a wonderful job year round. 

Although it is still February I was surprised with all the color in our garden. Several different varieties of daffodils, gerbia daisys, and other assorted colorful blooms. 

Pictured below are some of the Gerbia Daisys I found there. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

(click on image for larger view)

yellow gerbias

 

#murrellsinlet, #belin, #discoversc, #southcarolina, #canon, #myrtlebeach, #mymyrtlebeach, 

Also posted in Belin, flowers, garden, outdoor, photography, South Carolina, UMC

Full Moon Calendar 2017

Yesterday, January 12th, was the first full moon of 2017. Yesterday was also the first time this year I was asked “When is the next full moon?” 

Many cultures have given distinct names to each recurring full moon. The names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. The Farmer’s Almanac lists several names that are commonly used in the United States. The almanac explains that there were some variations in the moon names, but in general, the same ones were used among the Algonquin tribes from New England on west to Lake Superior. European settlers followed their own customs and created some of their own names.

This is when full moons will occur in 2017, according to NASA:

Date Name U.S. East UTC
Jan. 12 Wolf Moon 6:34 a.m. 11:34
Feb. 10 Snow Moon 7:33 p.m. 00:33 (2/11)
Mar. 12 Worm Moon 10:54 a.m. 15:54
Apr. 11 Pink Moon 2:08 a.m. 07:08
May 10 Flower Moon 5:43 p.m. 22:43
June 9 Strawberry Moon 9:10 a.m. 14:10
July 9 Buck Moon 12:07 a.m. 05:07
Aug. 7 Sturgeon Moon 2:11 p.m. 19:11
Sept. 6 Harvest Moon 3:03 a.m. 08:03
Oct. 5 Hunter’s Moon 2:40 p.m. 19:40
Nov. 4 Beaver Moon 12:23 a.m. 05:23
Dec. 3 Cold Moon 10:47 a.m. 15:47

 

Other Native American people had different names. In the book “This Day in North American Indian History” (Da Capo Press, 2002), author Phil Konstantin lists more than 50 native peoples and their names for full moons. He also lists them on his website, AmericanIndian.net.

Full moon names often correspond to seasonal markers, so a Harvest Moon occurs at the end of the growing season, in September, and the Cold Moon occurs in frosty December. At least, that’s how it works in the Northern Hemisphere.

In the Southern Hemisphere, where the seasons are switched, the Harvest Moon occurs in March and the Cold Moon is in June. According to Earthsky.org, these are common names for full moons south of the equator.

January: Hay Moon, Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Mead Moon
February (mid-summer): Grain Moon, Sturgeon Moon, Red Moon, Wyrt Moon, Corn Moon, Dog Moon, Barley Moon
March: Harvest Moon, Corn Moon
April: Harvest Moon, Hunter’s Moon, Blood Moon
May: Hunter’s Moon, Beaver Moon, Frost Moon
June: Oak Moon, Cold Moon, Long Night’s Moon
July: Wolf Moon, Old Moon, Ice Moon
August: Snow Moon, Storm Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon
September: Worm Moon, Lenten Moon, Crow Moon, Sugar Moon, Chaste Moon, Sap Moon
October: Egg Moon, Fish Moon, Seed Moon, Pink Moon, Waking Moon
November: Corn Moon, Milk Moon, Flower Moon, Hare Moon
December: Strawberry Moon, Honey Moon, Rose Moon

Here is a shot I took of last nights Wolf Moon – Aooooooooo

Wolf Moon

Wolf Moon, 1/12/17

Also posted in moon, outdoor, photography, South Carolina

Super Moon

Step outside on December 14, and take a look at the moon. Not only will the moon be full, but on that day, the moon will be at its closest point to our planet as it orbits Earth. This makes the December full moon a supermoon.

The term supermoon has entered popular consciousness in recent years. Originally a term from modern astrology for a new or full moon that occurs when the moon is within 90% of its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit, supermoon now refers more broadly to a full moon that is closer to Earth than average. But why is the moon closer to Earth at some times but not others?

Since the moon’s orbit is elliptical, one side (perigee) is about 30,000 miles (50,000 km) closer to Earth than the other (apogee). The word syzygy, in addition to being useful in word games, is the scientific name for when the Earth, sun, and moon line up as the moon orbits Earth. When perigee-syzygy of the Earth-moon-sun system occurs and the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun, we get a perigee moon or more commonly, a supermoon!

This coincidence happens three times in 2016. On October 16 and December 14, the moon becomes full on the same day as perigee. On November 14, it becomes full within about two hours of perigee—arguably making it an extra-super moon.

The full moon of November 14 was not only the closest full moon of 2016 but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century. The full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until November 25, 2034.

The supermoon of December 14 is remarkable for a different reason: it’s going to wipe out the view of the Geminid meteor shower. Bright moonlight will reduce the visibility of faint meteors five to ten fold, transforming the usually fantastic Geminids into an astronomical footnote. Sky watchers will be lucky to see a dozen Geminids per hour when the shower peaks. Oh well, at least the moon will be remarkable.

How remarkable?

A supermoon, or perigee full moon can be as much as 14% bigger and 30% brighter than an apogee full moon. However it’s not always easy to tell the difference. A 30% difference in brightness can easily be masked by clouds or the competing glare of urban lights. Also, there are no rulers floating in the sky to measure lunar diameters. Hanging high overhead with no reference points to provide a sense of scale, one full moon looks much like any other.

Low-hanging moons, on the other hand, can create what’s called a “moon illusion.” When the moon is near the horizon it can look unnaturally large when viewed through trees, buildings, or other foreground objects. The effect is an optical illusion, but that fact doesn’t take away from the experience.

A supermoon is undeniably beautiful as we saw on October 16 and this week November 14. We can see that beauty again on December 14: mark your calendar and enjoy the super moonlight.

super moon above princess super moon over crazy sister marina

Also posted in art and entertainment, marshwalk, Night photography, outdoor, South Carolina

My Home Murrells Inlet

This is a repeat from a post from 3 years ago. I thought some newcomers might enjoy it and others would enjoy it again.

Murrells Inlet

Murrells Inlet is my home! Everybody likes to brag about their home, and guess what — Murrells Inlet is legendary!   It’s the place where hushpuppies were invented, where Blackbeard and other pirates of the high seas stashed their ill-gotten booty. It’s the place where local and visitor alike have reported the chance meeting with one of the Inlet’s local ghosts.   History in our community began writing itself long before this area was officially named Murrells Inlet by the post office in 1913. The origin of this name remains a mystery with theories resting in passed-down legends of pirates and fishermen and incomplete records of landowners, plats and maps. 

By the 1700s, scores of pirates had taken to the high seas to intercept cargo vessels and make off with the goods.  The South Carolina coastal waters were especially productive for pirates. The coves and inlets along Murrells Inlet provided great hiding places for those marauders.

Pirates who became local legends include Edward Teach, also known as Blackbeard because of his coal-black beard, and Drunken Jack, who was left behind on an island with a huge stash of stolen rum (and died with a smile on his face).

Our history includes Native American tribes, 16th century Spanish explorers and English colonists.  By the 1800s successful rice plantations were producing almost 47 million pounds of rice and were more successful than the tobacco  and cotton plantations of the Southeast.

People who summered in Murrells Inlet in the 1800s generally traveled by steamboat docking at the Wachesaw River Landing.  The river steamboats were known for excellent food. Many of the steamboats’ cooks settled in Murrells Inlet, giving the area a reputation for savory cuisine long ago.

Yep – Murrells Inlet is where I call home! If you have not ever been here, you owe it to yourself to visit at least once. Put us on your “bucket list”!

Click on any image for larger view.

 

GardenCity-Seen-across-Murrells-Inlet-web DSCF0014 Kathy2-web EgretOnFence-web

Also posted in Waccamaw River

Marshwalk Sunset

Yesterday I decided to capture sunset. It didn’t look like the sky would cooperate, it was almost too clear. I decided to go to the Marshwalk here in Murrells Inlet and see what the view from Veterans Pier would offer. As soon as I got there I thought “this was a mistake”, but I walked on out the pier anyway. Facing the marina, with the sunset in the background, it didn’t look very promising. A group of old pillings offered a nice reflection. Then I turned around, looking towards Goat Island and saw what you see in the second image below. There was a tinge of pink in the sky and I thought I could maybe bring that out by using a Grad ND Filter. Then, just for the heck of it, I turned the filter upside down. I took the resulting image into Topaz Adjust and the third image you see is that result of that!

After shooting Goat Island I was ready to get in out of the cold, but as I readied to leave I saw that sunset was not quite the “bust” I thought. The fourth image is last nights (1/11/2016) sunset as seen over Crazy Sister Marina.

 

Marshwalk-Pilings-web Goat-Island-No-Filter-web Goat-Island-Sunset-Filter-web Sunset-Over-Crazy-Sister-web

Also posted in art and entertainment, inlet images, marshwalk Tagged , , |

American White Ibis

One of the most numerous wading birds in Florida, and common elsewhere in the southeast. Highly sociable at all seasons, roosting and feeding in flocks, nesting in large colonies. When groups wade through shallows, probing with their long bills, other wading birds such as egrets may follow them to catch prey stirred up by the ibises.

Florida population much lower than historical levels, and has continued to decline in recent decades. Total range in United States has increased somewhat, with northward spread on Atlantic Coast. Vulnerable to loss of feeding and nesting habitat.

Around their colonies, ibises eat crabs and crayfish, which in turn devour quantities of fish eggs. By keeping down the numbers of crayfish, the birds help increase fish populations.
The main conservation concerns for white ibis are hunting and habitat loss. Birds and eggs are hunted for food. When the colony is disturbed by hunting, adults will leave their nests and the young may die.
When feeding, White Ibis often give a soft, grunting croo, croo, croo as they forage. They may fly up to 15 miles a day in search of food.
A group of ibises has many collective nouns, including a “congregation”, “stand”, and “wedge” of ibises.

American White Ibis

American White Ibis

#ibis #bird #carolina #shorebird #murrellsinlet #southcarolina

Also posted in bird, outdoor, photography, South Carolina

Japanese Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle-web

Japanese Honeysuckle is a plant almost everyone knows. Children love it, because they can suck the sweet nectar from its flowers. Many adults hate it, since it grows quickly and can strangle other plants.

Japanese Honeysuckle can be a shrub or a vine. Usually it’s seen as a vine, growing up tree trunks or covering another shrub.

This plant was brought here from Asia and has spread steadily. It is is usually seen on the edges of woods, streams, or roads. It also lives in fields and gardens.

Japanese Honeysuckle has three-inch leaves which are green and oval-shaped. They are opposite, which means two leaves grow as a pair from the same spot on the stem, but on opposite sides.

The twigs of this plant are sometimes hairy.

Japanese Honeysuckle is best known for its sweet-smelling flowers. They are white at first, turning yellow as they get older. Flowers are also in pairs, and each flower can reach one and a half inches long. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, bees, and other insects visit the flowers for nectar. They also help pollinate the plant, taking pollen from one flower to another.

Pollination is how a plant can grow fruit, which holds seeds, which can grow into new plants. If honeysuckle doesn’t get pollinated, it can’t spread and grow new plants.

Honeysuckle fruits are small black beries, about 1/4 inch wide. Many birds eat them, including Tufted Titmouse, Northern Bobwhite, American Goldfinch, Northern Mockingbird, and Eastern Bluebird. Birds help the plants spread by pooping seeds out in new places.
Japanese Honeysuckle is a fast-growing climber. As it gets older, it develops a thick, woody stem. It is very strong and does not break easily.

This vine can climb trees, wrapping itself around the tree and covering branches with its own stems and leaves. If the tree can not get light to its leaves, or if the honeysuckle plant is soaking up all the water through its roots, the tree could die. This makes Japanese Honeysuckle a parasite.

Honeysuckle can quickly smother a shrub and it can cover low-growing plants as well. Many plants cannot compete with honeysuckle.

Some plants that Japanese Honeysuckle is often found near, or growing upon, include: Eastern Redcedar, oaks, American Beech, Yellow Poplar, Sassafras, pines, Sweetgum, American Elm, hickories, maples, Flowering Dogwood, Highbush Blueberry, Greenbrier, and Poison Ivy.

Also posted in art and entertainment, flowers, outdoor, photography

Great Egret

Formerly known as the “American Egret,” “Common Egret,” “Large Egret,” “White Egret,” “Great White Egret,” and “Great White Heron,” this bird’s official name in North America is now Great Egret. One of the most magnificent of our herons, it has fortunately recovered from historic persecution by plume hunters. But it is still not out of danger: The destruction of wetlands, especially in the West where colonies are few and widely scattered, poses a current threat to these majestic birds. Like the Great Blue Heron, it usually feeds alone, stalking fish, frogs, snakes, and crayfish in shallow water. Each summer many individuals, especially young ones, wander far north of the breeding grounds.

While making a quick run through Huntington Beach State Park in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, this afternoon, I spotted a Great Egret who had just caught a fingerling mullet. I was able to get a quick shot off and capture the event before the little mullet disappeared “down the hatch”.

Click on image for larger view.

Egret-with-fish-web

Also posted in bird, causeway, huntington beach, outdoor, South Carolina, state park Tagged , , , , , |