Pineapples of Moorea

Pineapples may be cultivated from a crown cutting of the fruit, possibly flowering in 5-10 months and fruiting in the following six months. Pineapples do not ripen significantly after harvest.

Pineapples can be consumed fresh, cooked, juiced, or preserved. They are found in a wide array of cuisines. In addition to consumption, the pineapple leaves are used to produce the textile fiber piña in the Philippines, commonly used as the material for the men’s barong Tagalog and women’s baro’t saya formalwear in the country. The fiber is also used as a component for wallpaper and other furnishings.

The flesh and juice of the pineapple are used in cuisines around the world. In many tropical countries, pineapple is prepared and sold on roadsides as a snack. It is sold whole or in halves with a stick inserted. Whole, cored slices with a cherry in the middle are a common garnish on hams in the West. Chunks of pineapple are used in desserts such as fruit salad, as well as in some savory dishes, including pizza toppings, or as a grilled ring on a hamburger. Crushed pineapple is used in yogurt, jam, sweets, and ice cream. The juice of the pineapple is served as a beverage, and it is also the main ingredient in cocktails such as the piña colada.

While on the island of Moorea last spring we took a tour that (among other places) went through a pineapple field. Below are a couple of images of what pineapples in the field look like and a third picture that I took just to be a little different. Click on the image to have a larger view. Hope you enjoy them.

pineapple

pineapple

pineapple

This entry was posted in French Polynesia, outdoor, photography.